We are now open and available to see patients in clinic. JumpStart therapist are also offering telehealth visits. For the safety of our staff, patients, and families we have implemented the following guidelines:

  1. Prior to coming to work each day the staff must self certify that they are fever free, have not had a fever in the past 48hrs, and have not been told to self isolate by a public health agency.
  2. All staff will be wearing the appropriate PPE including masks, and will glove for some manual based interventions.
  3. We have adjusted staff schedules to decrease the overall number of people occupying each clinic at any one time.
  4. Tables have been moved to promote social distancing of greater than six feet.
  5. We are cleaning before, during, and after patients are in the treatment area. This includes anything that may be touched by the patient. Our cleaning guidelines are based on recommendations from the CDC. Staff will be washing their hands before and after each patient treatment.
  6. Patients that are coming into the clinic must complete a screening tool to help prevent the spread of COVID19. This screening questionnaire will be sent to each patient prior to their appointment. The same questions apply to each return visit.
  7. We are asking that only patients come into the treatment area. If a caregiver must assist the patient, then the caregiver must also complete the screening tool.
  8. Any patient or caregiver coming into the clinic must be wearing a face mask from home before entering the building.
  9. Once a patient enters we are asking them to please wash their hands before they start working with the therapists.
  10. In regards to telehealth, we are using a secured platform and can easily send out the link for a telehealth visit with the therapist of your choice. Most insurances are covering this option.

Please contact us via our website or call one of the clinics should you have additional questions and to book your appointments now.

Stay safe and be well.
Dan and Jennifer Connors

Newsletter Video, July 2017

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Deep Vein Clots and Blockage

Deep vein clots—especially those in the thigh—can break off and travel through the bloodstream. If a clot lodges in an artery in the lungs, it can block blood flow and lead to a sometimes-deadly condition called pulmonary embolism. This disorder can damage the lungs and reduce blood oxygen levels, which can harm other organs as well.

Some Have a Greater Risk of Deep Vein Clots

Some people are more at risk for deep vein thrombosis than others. Usually people who develop deep vein thrombosis have some level of thrombophilia, which means their blood clots more rapidly or easily. In these cases, lifestyle can contribute to a blood clot forming—if you don’t move enough, for example. Your risk is higher if:

Having other diseases or conditions can also raise your chances of a blood clot. These include a stroke, paralysis (an inability to move), chronic heart disease, high blood pressure, surgical procedure, or having been recently treated for cancer.

Women who take hormone therapy pills or birth control pills, are pregnant, or within the first 6 weeks after giving birth are also at higher risk. So are those who smoke or who are older than 60. But deep vein thrombosis can happen at any age.

Steps to Take to Decrease Your Risk of Having Blood Clots

You can take simple steps to lower your chances for a blood clot. Exercise your lower leg muscles if you’re sitting for a long time while traveling. Get out of bed and move around as soon as you’re able after having surgery or being ill. The more active you are, the better your chance of avoiding a blood clot. Take any medicines your doctor prescribes to prevent clots after some types of surgery.

If You Suspect a Clot, Get Prompt Medical Attention

A prompt diagnosis and proper treatment can help prevent the complications of blood clots. See your doctor immediately if you have any signs or symptoms of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.. A physical exam and other tests can help doctors determine whether you’ve got a blood clot.

If you think you may be at risk for deep vein thrombosis, talk with your doctor.

Disclaimer

The information in this video is intended for informational and educational purposes only and in no way should be taken to be the provision or practice of physical therapy, medical, or professional healthcare advice or services. The information should not be considered complete or exhaustive and should not be used for diagnostic or treatment purposes without first consulting with your physical therapist, occupational therapist, physician or other healthcare provider. The owners of this website accept no responsibility for the misuse of information contained within this website.